FamousWhy.com Forum: Henry Ford - facts we must know - FamousWhy.com Forum

Jump to content

Rules when posting comments related to Articles.FamousWhy.com

You are free to post comments related only to the Articles you may found at http://Articles.FamousWhy.com

Please obbey to our Community Posting Rules as it is at the moderators discretion what is considered inadequate content which may result in deletion and/or user banning!
Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Henry Ford - facts we must know

#1 User is offline   Rimbaud 

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • View blog
  • Group: Senior Members
  • Posts: 394
  • Joined: 13-April 07

Posted 07 July 2007 - 07:46 AM



"Henry Ford and Mass Production " describes very well why Henry Ford is still famous. The most important thing that made him famous is the way he build the automobiles and his concepts of life.

When he turned seventy-one Henry showed up to meet the press wearing two different shoes. Asked about it by reporters, he looked down and, obviously making up an answer on the spot, said that he always wore one old shoe on his birthday to remind himself that he had once been poor and might be again. He still had his loose-limbed walk and springy gait; the netted wrinkles around his eyes collaborated with his mouth when he smiled.

He was still automatic news, charming even the reporters who came to 'get' him. Even his
rare refusals to do journalists' bidding were endearing. A photographer once asked him to pose between two boys with a hand on the head of each, and he refused. When asked why, he reminded the photographer about the picture of John Dillinger with an arm around the sheriff whose jail he later broke out of. 'You can see for yourself the spot 1'd be in if these two boys turned out badly: he said.

But if he was the same old Ford to the outer world, the employees close to him saw him as a different man. The practical jokes of a prior era had fermented into episodes of intentional cruelty; the belief in individuality and independence had become a sclerotic insistence on having his own way. It was Edsel who absorbed most of the punishment.

It was clear to everyone that Ford loved his son deeply, but it was the same sort of love as when Edsel was the little boy to whom he had been unusually close. Henry could not relinquish the role of father, and as Edsel tried to find ground he could occupy Henry tried to push him back into dependence, capriciously overturning the decisions Edsel made as president and humiliating him in front of others. When Edsel learned that yet another of his orders had been countermanded, his jaw would tighten and his features cloud. 'Well, I thought Father understood about this: he would say. 'Apparently somebody talked to him about it ... ' Finally he would shrug and repeat the only explanation he had for such behavior: 'Well, after all, my father built this business. It is his business.'
The Fords, An American Epic by Peter Collier and David Horowitz (AmE)
0

#2 User is offline   The Teacher 

  • The English Teacher
  • Icon
  • Group: Editor
  • Posts: 424
  • Joined: 16-July 07

Posted 29 July 2007 - 09:53 AM



i think that in the era of mergeures, joint ventures, purchasing & aqcuisitions the tradition is completely lost...
they struggled for capital to maintain the historical heritage, now they got capitl and the legacy is lost...nowadays, money is the only thing that matters
0

#3 User is offline   jpiyush 

  • Newbie
  • Pip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 4
  • Joined: 04-February 08

Posted 04 February 2008 - 10:43 AM

hi,
His concepts about life and business were clear and acceptable for all. New industrialists still find it applicable to progress.
0

#4 User is offline   Meeleend 

  • Newbie
  • Pip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 5
  • Joined: 10-May 08

Post icon  Posted 31 May 2008 - 10:48 AM

QUOTE (jpiyush @ Feb 4 2008, 10:43 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
hi,
His concepts about life and business were clear and acceptable for all. New industrialists still find it applicable to progress.

I agree with you jpiyush smile.gif
0

#5 User is offline   sEtH 

  • Admin
  • Icon
  • View blog
  • View gallery
  • Group: Administrators
  • Posts: 727
  • Joined: 22-July 06

Posted 03 June 2008 - 09:25 AM

QUOTE
New industrialists still find it applicable to progress.

Well, all our "Ancients" are models for us, all who discovered or did something great in the past are examples to us. Henry Ford was indeed on of them.
0

#6 User is offline   Willard Ivan 

  • FamousWhy Citizen
  • PipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 63
  • Joined: 22-June 09

Posted 04 August 2009 - 06:56 AM

In the grand scheme of things, the motor car hasn't really been around that long. It seems like a long time to some people because they aren't used to the idea that there was a time when cars weren't all over the place. They are too young to remember a time like that, but it happened. When Henry Ford brought out the first motor car it changed the world.
0

#7 User is offline   Lenovo 

  • Newbie
  • Pip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: 15-August 09

Posted 15 August 2009 - 04:08 AM

Yeah. Doing Article Submission on high PR site is best. Do forum participation and Comment posting on Dofollow blogs.
comparatif simulation taux credit auto - Taux crédit auto. Comparatif des offres! Les meilleurs taux crédit auto sont sur le net !comparatif simulation taux credit auto
0

#8 User is offline   manuela 

  • Newbie
  • Pip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: 09-October 10

Posted 09 October 2010 - 03:01 PM

View PostThe Teacher, on 29 July 2007 - 09:53 AM, said:

i think that in the era of mergeures, joint ventures, purchasing & aqcuisitions the tradition is completely lost...
they struggled for capital to maintain the historical heritage, now they got capitl and the legacy is lost...nowadays, money is the only thing that matters


If you want to find out more about Henry Ford, his legacy and his heritage, check this out:

http://www.hfha.org/index.htm

http://www.hfha.org/HenryFord.htm
0

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic